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Some students said it’s hard to find time to relax while in school. (Flickr/mrehan)

Nick Littlehales’ book Sleep – The Myth of 8 Hours suggests there’s a perfect moment in the day to take a nap that boosts alertness and awareness.

The British sleep guru, who coaches athletes, explains the components to getting the optimal rest.

He suggests taking 15 or 20 minutes to “zone out” – take a nap, be in solitude, whatever it may be, to aid in balance and boost one’s energy.

The perfect time to catch a few winks, according to Littlehales, is between 1-2 p.m. and 5-7 p.m., and a 30-minute sleep is the most practical, CTV News reported.

Dharshini Chanderbhan, the clinical director at Chanderbhan Counselling Services in Toronto, said that mindfulness and solitude are among the ways to reduce stress levels.

“We sometimes become so accustomed to the sense of being overwhelmed that we forget to pay attention to what our minds and bodies are telling us,” she said.

Chanderbhan said that by removing yourself from day-to-day distractions you may be able to boost your brain’s energy levels, concentrate better and be more productive.

Catherine McKee, a registered nurse at Humber College’s North campus, said sleep affects people drastically.

“Without enough sleep a person will be drowsy and unable to concentrate,” she said.

Early Childhood Education student Nalini Shameer said sleep is important to her. She said when she doesn’t take time to relax or sleep enough she gets restless.

Right now Shameer  said she has no time to worry about sleeping enough or relaxing because she’s focused on school.

Spa Management student Nicola Cameron said the same.

She said sleep “gets you rested and rejuvenated” but while in school it’s not possible.

“I wake up at 5 a.m. for an 8 a.m. class,” Cameron said. “By 1:30 p.m. when you have a lecture, you’re exhausted.”

She said that while in school, including her one hour travel time it’s virtually impossible to take the time to be in solitude.

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